The Story of Late Captain Wolfe

Spoiler Warning: Spoilers are contained within for the Skull & Shackles campaign path. I would not read this if you don’t want to encounter said spoilers.

This is meant to be a song that captures the most prominent stories of Captain Cyrus Wolfe, whose treasure reportedly lays buried in Mancatcher Cove. It is not one Dolce would have written, but rather one that would be circulating in the Shackles whenever old Captain Wolfe came up in conversation. I’m leaving the Spoiler warning on it because much of this information is gated behind a knowledge check so DMs should decide how much of it a player should know… So if you’re playing Skull & Shackles, as always, fair warning.

Enjoy!


The Story of Late Captain Wolfe

There once lived a pirate ’twas named Cyrus Wolfe
And a fearsome Free Captain was he!
His ship terrorized every trade lane and gulf
That was known on the rough Fever Sea.

Captain Wolfe once raided a Thuvian port,
And we all know of Aspenthar’s fate!
The captain set fire to twelve ladies at court,
And for peasants he charged them by weight!

This audacious act in the bright light of day
Earned the captain the hurricane crown!
Alas his true calling he could not betray
And the council he quickly turned down.

Let’s have a toast to the infamous pirate,
To his victories we can aspire!
Still we give thanks to be free of the tyrant,
Though his handiwork we yet admire!

‘Twas said Captain Wolfe caught himself quite a gem
From a convoy of far Katapesh.
Fair silks and fine treasures he’d taken from them,
Which he guarded with a pound of flesh.

Wolfe’s treasures lay hidden from isle to isle,
But the best of them saved til the last-
For Mancatcher Cove with wit and with guile,
And a creature he’d met in the past.

The fiend bought with his blood was one he knew well,
They were bound by an infernal pact,
And this wicked beast from the bowels of Hell,
Is still laboring for their contract.

Let’s have a toast to the infamous pirate,
To his victories we can aspire!
Still we give thanks to be free of the tyrant,
Though his handiwork we yet admire!

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